Faith’s ecological challenge

Continuing Sallie McFague’s thought in Blessed are the Consumers (from yesterday), the most significant challenge the religions could undertake for the well-being of our planet and its inhabitants—a challenge for which no other field is so well prepared—is “restraint” in consumerism.

McFague offers a helpful suggestion about how the world’s religions might go about this challenge. She wrote: Ironically, the greatest contribution the world’s religions could make to the sustainability challenge may be to take seriously their own ancient wisdom on materialism.

McFague wove threads of ancient wisdom with today’s sustainability challenge: Their special gift—the millennia-old paradoxical insight that happiness is found in self-emptying, that satisfaction is found more in relationships than in things, and that simplicity can lead to a fuller life—is urgently needed today.

Sustainability and conservation of resources seem to be themes that both progressives and conservatives could embrace—a magnanimous act of cooperation for the common good!

From “Environmental, Social, and Governance: What Is ESG and Why Is It Important?” by Liz Starr, Global Citizen, September 6, 2022

3 thoughts on “Faith’s ecological challenge”

    1. The Republican Party has boxed itself into a Trump-shaped corner. The party in 2020 didn’t bother to draft a platform. Trump was their platform. Now, one is either for him or is marginalized or exited.

      As I see it, the best conservative leaders on the sustainability issue (or any other issue) are in business rather than government. Savvy CEOs understand that long-term sustainability is essential for the planet, which means it is also good for the long-term viability of a business.

      Like

      1. Is there any respected conservative speaking about sustainability to consumers on any media outlet they might hear or read? (All my environmental group magazines are putting out a strong message, and hopefully, most conservative members aren’t tuning them out.)

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s